[Heir of Fire: Throne of Glass III] Sarah J. Maas

Spoilers for Throne of Glass and Crown of Midnight are below.

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Celaena is broken. Broken for the second time by a death she couldn’t prevent, she flees Adarlan and lands in Wendlyn, where Fae still live. There she languishes, unable to pull herself out of the pit she has found herself in. When a Fae male finds her in an alleyway, Celaena can no longer hide. Although she’s barely able to hold herself together, Celaena must address the many things she’s been running from–and figure out who she really is and who she wants to be when she comes out on the other side. If she comes out on the other side.

Something that Heir of Fire does extremely well is addressing the anger and sadness that you feel after the death of someone you love. Celaena is a fictional character, but art often reflects life. And life has loss. I thought that the way Maas wrote what Celaena was going through was incredible. The feeling of being lost, of being dead inside and having no will to move on…it was completely empathetic and resonated with me emotionally. There are times when you have to close yourself off completely and feel nothing or else you will shatter.

When she first meets Rowan, the Fae male who has been sent to find her for training, he is this hard character who has little sympathy for Celaena, who he views as a spoiled brat. She is unable to tell him exactly why she is so angry and sad all the time because she hasn’t come to terms with it herself. It is only when she is able to express this loss that he is shown as softer. Out of all the Fae and demi-Fae around them, he is someone who can truly understand what she is going through.

The rough start to their friendship is the reason that I loved Rowan as a character so much. He is so multi-faceted that it reflects back to Celaena and allows her to grow in ways that hadn’t been addressed in the first two novels. His rough yet kind attitude allows her to come to terms with the things she has been running from for nearly half of her life. She in turn helps him.

They’ve both had loss in their lives. It’s very easy to blame yourself for things you can’t control and they’ve both had this shadow over them. I loved reading how they related to each other and worked through their guilt, forgiveness, and understanding together. He is definitely my favorite character (sorry Chaol!). I’m intrigued to see how their friendship progresses in the next novels, especially with the little moments where I felt like there was something more there.

While I loved that a huge chunk of this novel was not occurring in Adarlan because it was nice to see another part of this world that had only been mentioned before, Dorian and Chaol are still in Rifthold. While there was the emotional tension in the scenes with Celaena, Chaol, and the Fae Queen, the tension I felt while reading about the events in Rifthold were of a different sort. The build-up to the climax of the novel was amazing. I felt lingering worry and the feeling that something bad was going to happen for the entirety of those scenes. Coupled with the beautifully written moments of Celaena learning how to forgive herself and coming into her heritage, this makes Heir of Fire my favorite book of the series, even after reading the next two books in the series.

Maas has a real talent in plotting out series and individual books. I was really able to see how things that were mentioned in the first two books came into the third one. The writing continues to be engaging and Heir of Fire definitely made me appreciate the series. There are connections that make sense now that the story has advanced to this point. I think that it’s helpful to read them successively because they do end on fairly intense cliff-hangers. I think that all of the talent that Maas demonstrated in the first two books (more the second than the first) finally culminated into an explosive middle book.

I’d like to end again with how much I loved Celaena in this book. She didn’t seem like herself because she wasn’t herself. Celaena lost who she was. She really struggled with the horrible things that had happened to her, her friends, and her family, and I thought that Maas did a great job of conveying this. I liked that Celaena was angry. She had a right to be angry. But she slowly found a way to keep that anger from controlling her. Celaena’s character progression in this book was my favorite thing about it and a  big reason why I liked it so much.

This book cemented the series as a favorite for me. I really love the inner and outer conflict and how it all is coming together.  I recommend this series for those who like fantasy and heroines and characters who are flawed but relateable.

5 stars.

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