[Read-Only: A Collection of Digital Horror] Caitlin Marceau and M. Regan

This is a short anthology by two authors who have put together a series of stories connected to our use of––and obsession with––technology. It’s horror, but few of the stories deal with gore. Instead the authors focus on the horror that can be hidden behind screens and underneath casual words. Most of the stories are in prose form, but there are a few that are in a text or forum style, which made me read them more quickly and provided suspense that built to the end of the exchange.

This is a book that’s slightly out of my comfort zone because of the word horror on the cover. But the idea of digital horror was intriguing so I was glad to be given a copy by one of the authors.  I’ve read M.Regan’s work before but Caitlin Marceau was a new author for me. While both authors are similar in that they’re focusing on a theme, their writing styles are different in ways that set them apart from one another.

Regan tends to focus on the lyrical, her writing producing images both beautiful and grotesque, depending on the situation. I love alliteration, so I was pleased with her use of it. I think there’s an amount of intelligence in her work that keeps the reader on their toes intellectually, meaning that you have to pay attention to what’s going on instead of reading through quickly. I think that her stories are packed with potential and they went in ways that I couldn’t always predict. I liked how she led her reader down certain paths and left hints for them to unravel.

As for Marceau, she puts us in the minds of her characters immediately. Whether they’re looking for the one or looking for the next 100 likes, they’re vividly created in a short amount of time. Her stories are longer than M. Regan’s in this anthology, which allows her to meander as she builds the setting and creates the tone of the story. I found her stories to be the perfect blend of real and what if?, making her stories spookily possible. I enjoyed reading her work, the stories pertinent to our digital age and obsession. They were well thought out and plotted. I do wish that tildes and asterisks weren’t used as section breaks, though. 

I’ve decided that I’m going to individually review the stories and then give an overall rating of the anthology itself. If you’d like to see my final thoughts on the anthology and my rating, please scroll to the end.

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Kinda Stuck

M. Regan

This is the first story in the anthology and I think it works really well. It introduces a text element immediately, which sets the tone for the rest of the anthology. I found the use of repetition to be delightfully creepy. The suspense is created in just a short amount of time and it was very effective. While I enjoyed this story, there was a point where I couldn’t suspend my disbelief that multiple people would fall into the same trap within the story.

4 stars.

This is also the story that watchmojo decided to create a video on, so if you’re intrigued by what this anthology is about, check it out.


M. Regan

Honestly I’m not sure how I feel about this one. I enjoyed the idea of it, but there’s a lot happening in a short amount of time. I would have liked to have been given more details in order for the buildup to the end to be more satisfying. I was disappointed that it ended when it did because I feel like it’s more of a beginning of something rather than a short story. I liked the idea of technology going after people (at least that’s how I read it!) and I wanted to see more. It seemed like the idea could have blossomed into a longer story.

3 stars.


Caitlin Marceau

The obsession in this one was insane. And highly relatable, which was kind unsettling. Most everyone has some form of social media today; most everyone is cruising for those likes or little hearts. If you look to the side of your screen, you’ll see that I do it on bookstagram. There have been times when I’ve had to remind myself to step away from the screen because I find myself thinking What more can I do? and it’s very disheartening. Such is the feeling that Ava has when she manages her social media account. She is desperate for those likes, to the point where she considers a potentially dangerous app that is said to make you extremely beautiful. I didn’t like the amount of woman on woman hate, particularly when it was against her supposed best friend. But I did think the execution and pacing of this story was done really well, despite the predictability of the ending. This was my favorite of Marceau’s stories.

5 stars.


M. Regan

This was my favorite short story in the whole anthology. I enjoyed the references to mythology as well as the subtle notes that led the reader to the end of the story. I also liked the idea of a character who learned everything from the internet. Honey is a great example of horror happening in the everyday. Technology took a backseat as Regan focused her story on the conversation happening between two friends. It was very much the familiar being tainted with the feeling that something isn’t as it seems, which made me feel unsettled as I followed where the story was leading me. The pacing was superb in this one. It was a great short story that had me chuckling at the reveal, happy that I had properly guessed the ending. The addition of the third character, a daughter, gave the story Hitchcock and Poe vibes in my opinion. I’d like to know what will happen to the daughter in the future.

5 stars. Continue reading


Reading and Reviewing: July Edition

*・゜Currently Reading*・゜

This month is going to be a bit light on the reading because I’m in the process of moving. I’ve fallen behind in what I want to read and review, so I’m going to need to kick it into high gear if I want to finish my goals by the end of the year! I’m hoping that once things settle down I’ll be able to get back into reading two or more books a week.

*・゜Netgalley Wishlist*・゜

I actually got a lot of my wishes granted! Originally I had The Rattled Bones on this list, but as you can see, it moved! I’m hoping I get this last one granted.

Continue reading