[The Bone Witch] Rin Chupeco

30095464

The Bone Witch was a novel with a nice premise but the execution was not strong enough to keep my interest. Told in two perspectives, The Bone Witch follows Tea, a Dark Asha, as she discovers her powers in the past and in the present as she tells her story to a banished storyteller. Her story begins when she accidentally brings her brother back from the dead and soon she is fully entrenched in her new life as a Dark Asha, one of the rare witches who can raise and command the dead, both human and daeva. Her training means that she gains more control and she must make decisions that will affect her future and that of those around her.

There were things I really liked about this novel. I thought that the fantasy part of it–the idea of it, at least–was something that was creative. I liked that the main character was ostracized even by other witches because of her powers and that she didn’t have control over them at first. I particularly liked the idea that you couldn’t hide the feelings in your heart–unless you literally hid it behind something–because you had a heartsglass that swirled with color. The little touches like this were really well done, but ultimately The Bone Witch fell too much to the side of information dumping.

The world, when it should have been interesting, was full of too much information at one time. Despite the amount of information given to me, I don’t feel like I know much about the world. Few things really stood out. I know a little bit about the daeva, these monster-like creatures that are reborn every so many years, terrorize the general populace, and need to be put down by the Dark Asha again. Then there are all of these places that were mentioned multiple times and are likely important, but I couldn’t keep any of them straight. I’m not sure if it was because of the information dumping, the point of view, or the storytelling itself, but I just couldn’t distinguish one from the other.

I loved the culture of the Asha, however. It reminded me of what I know about the geisha culture but with the added element of fighting. I wish that the classes that Tea had taken hadn’t been glossed over, because that would have been really cool to read more about. Especially the Dark Asha. They’re a dying type of witch that are extremely rare. If they’re needed to basically save everyone, why the heck are they so ostracized? Give me more of those details! Show me more on why Tea is where she is when we see her in the present. I need to see it, not be told it.

I do think that there was some element of failure in the choice that Rin Chupeco made regarding the points of view. Half of the story was told in Tea’s point of view and the other half was told in the Bard’s point of view as he listens to an older Tea. Both were lacking in that drive that really makes me want to read a story. I felt that it was two stories in one–that of a girl discovering her power and that of a woman trying to start a war–and neither of them really meshed well with the other. Every time I felt that I was getting into one story, we jumped back into the other. It was really frustrating. Having two first person points of view didn’t help either. I should have known who they were at the end of the novel, but I didn’t. And not knowing the characters made it really hard to get into the novel.

I do think that people may like this book. There’s a really interesting magic system and the novel ends with the promise of more action in the next novel. I just wish some of that action had been in this novel. For me personally, however, it didn’t leave me with enough that I want to check out the next book. I felt that for all of the inaction in the novel, to cram all of the action at the end solely to have a cliffhanger that leads into the next book was pretty lame. When I found so much of the book to be slow and boring, that bit at the end is not going to save it. The Bone Witch needed to start more in the middle of the story and its action rather than the very beginning. The very beginning was engaging, but as the book went on it lost that spark. Ultimately, I felt like nothing happened. So while it wasn’t the worst book (although I should have just put it down and not finished it in the end), I can’t rate it any higher than this.

2 stars.