[Geekerella] Ashley Poston

Geekerella is the most adorable book I’ve read this year. It is full of geeky references to BatmanStar TrekStar WarsFireflyThe Lord of the Rings… and so many more. It embraced fandom and all of the different facets of it: how you feel when your favorite thing is remade or made into a movie for the first time, fanfiction, reaction posts, cosplaying, and connecting with fans across the world with something you’re passionate about. Ashley Poston takes all of that and writes a retelling of Cinderella that fits in with this geeky culture that is often written off by people who don’t understand it.

The novel is divided between two points of view, Elle and Darien. Elle is our heroine who lives and breathes Starfield, the show she shared with her late father. Starfield is getting a reboot and Elle is equal parts thrilled and worried. She wants it to be for her generation–it’s bound to be better than the cardboard cutouts they had to use for props in the original–but worried about who will be cast as the main characters. When teen actor Darien Freeman is cast as her favorite character, her hero Federation Prince Carmindor, she thinks that everything Starfield will be ruined by this teen actor who only knows the basic answers to questions about the fandom. Elle wants a fan to play Carmindor–or at least someone who took the time to learn about what he’s stepping into–is that too much to ask?

As for Darien, playing Carmindor is his dream role. Like Elle, he grew up with Starfield. Only no one knows that. No one believes that this teen heart-throb with his screaming legion of fangirls has any depth. He used to love the geeky culture of Starfield, back when he wasn’t famous. Now that he’s famous, he can’t be Darien Freeman, geek who  likes Batman and Starfield. He has to be Darien Freeman, teen actor who lives for being in the spotlight, who took on this role because it would catapult him into fame. More and more, Darien feels that he is losing himself.

I was worried that Geekerella was going to be an instant-love story. With how it was described in the summary, it seemed like Elle and Darien wouldn’t meet until the convention. Thankfully it was not the case. In a world where sometimes we only interact with people through a screen, I thought that Poston’s use of a mistaken number worked really well for this novel. The reader knows the whole time of the identity of those texting, so it was nice to see how their relationship grew without having prior knowlege of who they each were or what they looked like.

While Geekerella did follow the expected points of Cinderella, they were changed to fit into Elle’s world. Instead of a pumpkin being turned into a carriage, there’s a food truck that’s painted like a pumpkin. It’s an eyesore. And loud. It made me hungry for vegan tacos. I loved it. There’s the expected mean stepmother and horrible stepsisters who share a slightly dilapidated house. But there’s no magic. The only magic that comes into this story is the magic you feel when you fall in love and when you have the hope that dreams can come true. It was modern and wholly passionate.

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[Heartless] Marissa Meyer

I love the cover of my edition.

I love the cover of my edition.

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Heartless is the story of the Queen of Hearts before she was the Queen of Hearts, before she was cold and angry, before she called incessantly for the heads of those who had wronged her. Before she was the Queen of Hearts she was Catherine, a girl who daydreamed about falling in love and of starting a bakery full of the treats she had created by her own hands. Renowned for her cakes and tarts, she’s caught the eyes and the heart of the foolish King of Hearts, who is not what she envisions for a future husband at all. Unfortunately for Cath, her mother and father desire something more for her than a floured apron. As her future comes closer, Cath starts running out of options. If she wants to avoid her fate, she must try to find another path.

I was really excited to read Heartless because The Lunar Chronicles is a really good young adult series. Perhaps it’s because Heartless is a standalone, but I really didn’t find it as engaging as her series. I didn’t feel bored, exactly, but I felt a little like I was reading just to pass the time, rather than reading for pure pleasure. In fact, I ended up setting the book aside for a week because of work and didn’t feel a drive to return to it. Not in the way that The Lunar Chronicles had me going back.

This book is well-written but I’m left feeling underwhelmed at its overall content. I don’t know if I went into it expecting more than it was able to give, but I didn’t find this quite the page-turner that I expected it to be. I loved Meyer’s first series and had high hopes that I would enjoy this one just as much, but ultimately it’s only just okay.

The idea of before in Heartless was really interesting. I liked that it was an origin story of a character who is traditionally viewed as a villain. Catherine’s descent into the familiar red-faced Queen of Hearts was, for the most part, well thought out and written. But somewhere around the middle the book just dragged.

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[Wintersong] S. Jae-Jones

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Wintersong is the story of what happens when you make wishes and promises to a mysterious stranger and they come to collect. Liesl is nineteen and dreams of composing, but she’s put her desires on hold in order to help out at her family inn, train her brother for a position as a violinist, and indulge her younger sister in her vanities. Liesl has to content herself with snatched moments and hidden scraps of her compositions as she acts as the strong, older sister. But when her younger sister is stolen by the Goblin King, Liesl has to remember the songs and stories of her childhood in order to save her from a Goblin King who deals in riddles and trades. Suddenly, Liesl finds herself in a precarious position deep underground in the world of the Goblin King. It is there that she discovers more about herself than she ever allowed herself to learn. As she passes the threshold from innkeeper girl to adult composer, Liesl has to make a choice about just how much she is willing to sacrifice.

Wintersong had an extremely strong start. Jae-Jones introduced us to her world slowly using beautiful language reminiscent of music. The story promised touches of the fantastic that is often found in fairy tales. I truly enjoyed reading how Jae-Jones used words to construct a familiar yet fairy tale-esque world. The inclusion of Christina Rossetti’s poetry at the beginning of each part of the book also set the stage for what was to happen perfectly without giving too much away. Threaded throughout the story was the language of classical music. Sadly I didn’t understand this as well as I understood the poetry due to the fact that I never studied music in the way that Jae-Jones seems to have. I thought it was a really unique way of writing. It wasn’t something that I had seen before. I was glad that Jae-Jones used it to enhance her writing rather than overwhelm her story with it.

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[Mad about the Hatter] Dakota Chase

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I thoroughly enjoyed this retelling of Alice in Wonderland. I’ve never read any of Lewis Carroll’s work other than a few of his poems, but I know enough of Alice to find it familiar. Dakota Chase took the story and turned it on its head a bit. Instead of a young girl protagonist, we have her brother. There’s quite an age gap between them, and Henry proves to be just enough of an angsty 17 year old to appear real but not too angsty to become horribly annoying. Henry has heard stories of Wonderland since he was a young child. It’s always frustrated him that something bad happened to his sister and he’s never heard the truth. Henry believes that since he’s almost an adult he deserves the real story. Obviously, Wonderland is not a real place. Mad Hatters, endless tea parties, and violent, paranoid Red Queens are the things of fairy tales. Imagine his surprise when he finds himself face to face with a hookah smoking, talking Caterpillar?

Perhaps because Henry has always denounced Alice’s stories, when he finds himself in Wonderland he really can’t believe that everything that starts happening to him is truly happening. His misgivings, fears, and curiosity were nice to read. Finding yourself in another world is cool, but I find it unrealistic when characters don’t reflect on their new surroundings. They sometimes accept them too quickly. The changes in Henry are realistic and very gradual. They don’t happen immediately, and it allows his relationships with the inhabitants of Wonderland to progress slowly. Henry’s curiosity allowed us to see parts of Wonderland that Hatter would have had us pass through quickly.

This is the second male / male romance novel I’ve read, the first being Always Leaving, a short novel by Gene Gant that I received from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. (Found here) It was a less than stellar romance, between stalking-like behavior and a not so amazing romantic connection between the two male leads. So I was a little worried that I’d find the same here: romance that was forced and not realistic. This was so lovely. Henry and Hatter were both very confident with their sexuality. There was no waffling about how they felt. It was very straightforward: love is just love. They’ve both had various romantic tangles with various genders. There was an emphasis on finding that person that gave them the spark and not so much on anything else.

I wish there had been more time spent in setting up Wonderland. Everything that was included was incredibly visual, but there just wasn’t enough. I would have loved to see more areas as Henry and Hatter journeyed all over Wonderland.  Mad about the Hatter was whimsical in its scene setting and had some of the most entertaining similes. I had a lot of fun reading this novel and would recommend it for people who enjoy retellings of fairy tales. It’s a nice companion to the original story. Mad about the Hatter is set in contemporary times with elements of the old mixed in.

4 stars.

I received a copy of this title from NetGalley and the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Mad about the Hatter was available on August 20th, 2015.