Top Ten Tuesday: How does it end? I’ll look it up online, because I’m not continuing these ones

I thought that it was going to be a bit challenging to find series that I’m not going to complete. Turns out I was wrong. There’s actually a ton of firsts in series that I started but I’ll never finish. Sometimes it’s because I didn’t enjoy the characters; other times it’s because I found the plot lacking. And sometimes, they just aren’t my thing, even though the synopsis made it sound super interesting. Usually I stop with the first book, but there are a few series where I’ve gone on to read the second or more. Basically that comes down to my mood.

The series I’m listing here are books I’ve read over the past few years. Some of them are extremely popular and are loved by many readers. But for me, these are books I just didn’t connect with on a level that’s needed to commit to three or more books. It’s purely my opinion, though I am curious if anyone feels the same!

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1. An Ember in the Ashes and A Torch Against the Night: I didn’t particularly love the world. It was very harsh, which is fine, but it felt like the world building relied too heavily on the reader to fill in the blanks. The characters were okay. The problems I had in the first book basically became more problematic in the second, so I decided not to continue this planned four book series.

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2. The Bone Witch: I wanted to love this one. I think the dual perspective killed it for me. Both followed the main character, Tea: one in the past as she’s finding her powers and the other in the present as she’s trying to explain her actions. It split the book in a way that was confusing and kept me from fully immersing myself into the story. I did love the cover, though! There’s three books planned.

3. The 100: Maybe if I had read this one before seeing the show I would have liked it. I feel like the ideas in this book––though interesting––are undeveloped. It may get better in the next ones, but I think I’ll just stick to the show. Apparently the things I like about the show aren’t even in the books, which is weird. There’s four books in this series.

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4. The Graces: The reason I wanted to read this in the first place was because there’s witches in it. I’m a huge fan of Charmed, and have been constantly chasing that witch high ever since then. (Send me witchy read recommendations!) This had an unreliable narrator and I found that I just didn’t particularly care about anything that happened. So far there’s only two books in this series.

5. Blackhearts: I knew going into this that it was a prequel to Blackheart becoming Blackheart, but I still expected more pirate action than there ended up being.

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Reading and Reviewing: July Edition

*・゜Currently Reading*・゜

This month is going to be a bit light on the reading because I’m in the process of moving. I’ve fallen behind in what I want to read and review, so I’m going to need to kick it into high gear if I want to finish my goals by the end of the year! I’m hoping that once things settle down I’ll be able to get back into reading two or more books a week.

*・゜Netgalley Wishlist*・゜

I actually got a lot of my wishes granted! Originally I had The Rattled Bones on this list, but as you can see, it moved! I’m hoping I get this last one granted.

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[The Epic Crush of Genie Lo] F.C. Yee

Chinese folklore, action, and the threat of a demon invasion. That is what The Epic Crush of Genie Lo is made of. Epic Crush is the debut novel from F.C. Yee, and combines high school classes and college prep with hunting down demons and learning how to control sudden powers. The gods, goddesses, and demons from Chinese mythology were unfamiliar, but they were integrated into a modern setting in a way that introduced them to a reader who has little to no knowledge of them.

I know nothing about Chinese mythology, so this was my first introduction to the gods, goddesses, and demons. It worked for me and I enjoyed reading a book that also taught me something. Ultimately, I’m not sure if learning about folklore from a YA book is the best because authors sometimes pick and choose, but it was interesting enough for me! I enjoyed that both Chinese names and translated names were used. It was a good choice because had all traditional names been used, I think it would have had the tendency to run together, but if all names were translated, it would have given the book a childishness that the book doesn’t deserve.

I really like books that incorporate an older, mythological setting and characters into a modern one. I like the urban fantasy aspect that it creates for books. While I felt that the modern setting was a bit too vague and relied on the reader to supply what they thought the Bay area looked like, I was able to imagine the world of the gods that existed alongside the modern one through the descriptions given to me in the stories Genie learned about. So while I felt that the normal setting was a bit bland and unrealized, the mythology behind it made it much more interesting.

The main character in Epic Crush is Genie, a girl prepping for college by studying hard, going to an adviser, and generally doing any volunteer activities that will help her get into a college far, far away from her hometown. That’s her main goal. She’s kind of thrown for a loop when she’s suddenly told that she has powers, but they’re not exactly the standard ones. There’s a lot of adjusting, and then there’s even more adjusting when something is revealed that makes her question her whole identity. I thought it was an interesting take on the powers trope. It isn’t something I’ve read before, so I was pleasantly surprised by it.

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